THE SERENGETI

After breakfast, depart with picnic lunch to central Serengeti famous for it's resident predators and open flat plains offering spectacular game viewing!  (Distance from Rhino Lodge to Serengeti entrance gate is approximately 1 and a half to 2 hours and another 3 hours driver from the entrance gate to Kiota Camp depending on what you see during the 3 hour transfer en route to Kiota Camp.)
The Serengeti and the The Great migration

Serengeti National Park is located in Northern Tanzania and covers an area of about 14.670 km². The park was founded in 1920 and became a National Park in 1951. The Park is especially famous for it’s immense Wildebeest and Zebra herds, but it is not with out reason that it is also known as the best place for observation wildlife in general. The animals that live in the Serengeti, stay there all year round, and in large numbers. The Great Migration is as old as human history. Fossils that were found in the Olduvai canyon, prove that Wildebeests have already been using the planes of the Serengeti for their migration over a million years ago. Already to those times, they were following the rains through the Serengeti.

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The Serengeti is one of the ten natural travel wonders of the world. The Serengeti migration is as remarkable as it is impressive.This migration takes place twice a year within Kenya and Tanzania and is considered one of the greatest migrations of wildlife on the planet. Its ecosystem is spread across 60,000 square kilometers and is home to the largest diverse concentration of wildlife and famous for infamous for the migration of nearly two million Wildebeests, Zebras, and Antelopes. Nearly 400,000 Calves are born between the middle of January and the end of February.
The yearly cycle begins in the south of the park, where half a million calves are born between January and March. But when the rains end in May the land dries fast and the grazing animals must move on, heading for their dry season refuge in the Maasai Mara. The key players in this 1,200-mile odyssey are the wildebeest – 1.5 million of them – accompanied by 200,000 zebras, 350,000 Thompson's' impala and grant's gazelles.For them, every year is an endless journey, chasing the rains in a race for life.

The action takes place across 150,000 square miles of woodlands, hills and open plains, a wilderness that includes not only the Serengeti national park and Kenya’s Maasai Mara game reserve but also the dispersal areas beyond.With the beginning of the short rains in late October the migration makes its way back into the Serengeti, so this a good time to be anywhere in the north of the park between Klein’s Camp and the Lamai Wedge. By December, having emerged from the northern woodlands, the herds return past Seronera to mass on their calving grounds again and the circle is complete.But as soon as the rains return the wildebeest head back to the Serengeti, drawn towards their calving grounds in the park’s deep south. Between January and March when the calves are born there is nowhere on Earth so vibrantly alive.

When the rains end in May the wildebeest make tracks for the Maasai Mara. Some take Route One – north across the Seronera Valley. Others swing through the Western Corridor, but for all of them the journey is beset with danger. For a start there are the famous Serengeti lions – about 3,000 at the last count – to which can be added leopards and cheetahs, hungry hyena clans and monster crocodiles. The river crossing is most likely one on the most dramatic events in the Serengeti!
 
The exact dates of the actual river crossing is always a mystery but it is usually around the end of July through mid-August